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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:06 am 
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lil' hucker

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This thread is to discuss what your ideas about how to handle our super-bright night riding lights when appraaching other riders, and joggers /walkers, on the trail.
Also, what's your take on how to proceed in traffic on the road and./or paved bike paths?

Here's what marpilli had to say:
"Definitely worth discussing and we can branch into a new thread if you like. I only use a handlebar mounted light when I commute and over half of the trip is on paved multi-use paths. I always watch for bikers, joggers, and dog walkers ahead of me. When I see them I tilt the handlebar light downward so it doesn't blind them.

When ridding at night in the woods using a helmet light I either turn it down or make sure my head is pointed away from another rider when I've stopped to chat.

Common courtesy..."

And here's what Sti had to add;
"I don't meet many people / cars on my night rides, but when I do, I cover the light with my hand or try to point it away."

So, whaddya ya think?

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 4:34 pm 
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friendly kitty

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My biggest gripe is going on night rides, and someone behind me with 3000 lumens getting pushy, riding my ass, and wiping out the range of my Magic Shine 900 lumen SSCP7, with my humongous body providing a shadow for exactly what is directly in front of me. If you do group rides at night, and you ride with Howitzer power lights on your helmet and bars, have some courtesy and back off a decent amount of the rider in front of you, they do cast a wide, blind shadow in front of them when your lights are on their back, so back off a good ways, and don't tailgate.

Don't cast your beam upon them, space yourselves out accordingly on group rides... I don't enjoy being blinded and running into stuff because your light in back of me leaves a huge blind spot where I can't see where I am riding. My eyes involuntarily will adapt to the brightest light source, you back off and now I am seeing nothing but black spots and am night blind.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 5:18 pm 
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pussy
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Heh, good points RandyBoy.

Good write up, Ray. My good friend summed it up with "when on group night rides, we are like a bunch of autistic kids, desperately trying not to make eye contact with each other and looking sideways". ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:16 pm 
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lil' hucker

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Sti wrote:
Heh, good points RandyBoy.

Good write up, Ray. My good friend summed it up with "when on group night rides, we are like a bunch of autistic kids, desperately trying not to make eye contact with each other and looking sideways". ;)


That's perfect ettiquette.


Since Randy posted up a sore point, I'll share one. When approaching other riders on the trail going in opposite directions, and we both have really bright lights, I typically dim my helmet light ad put my had over the bar light.

But about half the time, the approaching rider does not reciprocate. Not at all, even when I dim and shield my lights from them well out there in advance. When this happens I usually have a hearty "asshole!" -type comment for them when they pass.
Am I being mean?

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 8:22 pm 
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friendly kitty

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Ray Dolor wrote:
Sti wrote:
Heh, good points RandyBoy.

Good write up, Ray. My good friend summed it up with "when on group night rides, we are like a bunch of autistic kids, desperately trying not to make eye contact with each other and looking sideways". ;)


That's perfect ettiquette.


Since Randy posted up a sore point, I'll share one. When approaching other riders on the trail going in opposite directions, and we both have really bright lights, I typically dim my helmet light ad put my had over the bar light.

But about half the time, the approaching rider does not reciprocate. Not at all, even when I dim and shield my lights from them well out there in advance. When this happens I usually have a hearty "asshole!" -type comment for them when they pass.
Am I being mean?

Not at all, in fact, if you see them on a regular schedule or basis, you can always just leave your helmet light on full power, and look directly at them, then politely ask if your lights are bothering them. If they respond "yes" then politley respond, "same here, that's a mighty powerful light you have turned on there that needs to be aimed quite a a bit lower, so as to not be obnoxious."

Sometimes an idiot needs a little taste of what ails you to see the error of their ways.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2015 7:35 am 
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lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
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RandyBoy wrote:
Ray Dolor wrote:
Sti wrote:
Heh, good points RandyBoy.

Good write up, Ray. My good friend summed it up with "when on group night rides, we are like a bunch of autistic kids, desperately trying not to make eye contact with each other and looking sideways". ;)


That's perfect ettiquette.


Since Randy posted up a sore point, I'll share one. When approaching other riders on the trail going in opposite directions, and we both have really bright lights, I typically dim my helmet light ad put my had over the bar light.

But about half the time, the approaching rider does not reciprocate. Not at all, even when I dim and shield my lights from them well out there in advance. When this happens I usually have a hearty "asshole!" -type comment for them when they pass.
Am I being mean?

Not at all, in fact, if you see them on a regular schedule or basis, you can always just leave your helmet light on full power, and look directly at them, then politely ask if your lights are bothering them. If they respond "yes" then politley respond, "same here, that's a mighty powerful light you have turned on there that needs to be aimed quite a a bit lower, so as to not be obnoxious."

Sometimes an idiot needs a little taste of what ails you to see the error of their ways.


Well, Randy, tonight I saw nobody on the trail at all, but if I get out tomorrow night, and I suspect I will the Ninjas will be doing their weekly workout on those very same trails.
I should have multiple opportunities to practice that technique, then.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2015 12:36 pm 
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timid kitty
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Undoubtedly. I think everyone has brought up and addressed the predominately valid etiquette points. Regarding RandyBoy's point about approaching riders and their failure to reciprocate the look away/dimming light etiquette. I think this is more common with those somewhat newer to night riding. I have generally found these guys figure it out pretty quickly through peer association.

Another thing that we have tried and this doesn't always work, is to get those with the brightest lights in the front with the lesser powered lights in the rear. This works if the faster guys have the brighter lights. It tends to create problems when the dimmer/faster guys are in the back and the brighter/slower guys are leading.

For a smaller group of riders where everyone tends to stick together and not focus so much on motoring at 100%, this usually isn't a problem.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2015 5:41 am 
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lil' hucker

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Personally, I really try to avoid night riding with more than one or two other riders. Out here in the super-dry southwest, the dust that's kicked up by just one rider looks really thick in the beam of a helmet light at night. Makes you think about what your'e breathing in.

Imagine that multiplied by 80, and that's what the Ninja night races looked like. It was like a thick fog that was about 3 feet above the ground. You simply could not see the trail.
This gave me yet another unfair advantage if I had entered the races. I know those trails from riding them up to 5 nights a week, like just about nobody else does. And in my age group....60-99 years old, There was only one other guy who had the sheer speed to match me, but he lacks both the trail handling skills, being primarily a roadie, and the trail knowledge. He would have crashed trying to beat me, and in the last race, when the course went up Humiliation Hill, some guy, a younger guy in a younger and faster age group, crashed so bad on that climb that he suffered a compound fracture of one of his arms. The humerus, I think.

Nothin' funny about that.

Everybody, including my riding buddy, who won every age group they had for 'Clydes in both races, says I could have won for sure....but to me, that doesn't even sound like a race. It sounds like a beating, administered to someone with their hands cuffed behind their back.

I don't like racing anyways, but to race and win under conditions like that, just seems stupid to me.

As to brightness, one thing I learned from my friend, who has a lot more miles on the road than I have, is that when you are riding in dense traffic at night, like when we ride through downtown, the brighter your bike lights are, the better. Drivers see their cars' entire interior lit up by a blazing light coming through their windshield, side windows, even their rear view mirrors, and the vast majority of them react like" it's the cops!", and they drive extra-careful. Virtually nobody veers INTO the light. So when I'm trying to maintain 25 mph+ to make all the synchronized greens on 'B' Street downtown, if I have to pass car going slow in the right lane, I light them up as I pull around their left side, they sure as hell let me. Cops have let us know that they think it's 'cool', too. Literally.

We always point to that part of the ride as our 'sprint' training. It gets anaerobic, for sure.

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