HK

the place for sore tacos
It is currently Thu Oct 18, 2018 4:59 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 9:18 am 
Offline
fat kitty!
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:08 pm
Posts: 108
In an attempt not to derail vmac's thread with philosophical questions about light, I'll pop my general questions here..

I see you guys talking about a boatload of lumens both front and rear. I have an Ay-Up setup with a pen spot for the helmet and a flood light for the handlebar. It also comes with optional red covers to use one as a rear light when commuting, but why would I need a powerful rear light, I'm not going in that direction anyway. Rear light is just about being seen so I use a cheapo $10 blinky thingy for that - it doesn't illuminate anything but the cars will see me and avoid me.

At the front I see the point in bright lights. A normal commuter bike light doesn't really light up anything, like the rear one it's mostly there for you to be spotted by other traffic. On lit up city streets that might be fine, but in the pitch dark of the woods you need something more. Question is, how much more do you really need?

My Ay-Up's are rated at 700 lumens each if I'm not mistaken. That's pretty bright compared to regular commuter lights, but pretty weak compared to those 2000 lumens monsters you guys talk about. Thing is, the human eye adjusts to the light available and I've honestly never ridden with my lights at the full power setting, half power does the job just fine. At half power the flood light easily allows me to see the next 30-40 yards or so and pen spot on my helmet allows me to put light on objects even further away. Sure, full power gives even more light, but why would I need that when half power lights up more than I really need?

Huge light makes more sense if you ride really, really fast. In a car going 60 mph it would be crazy to use a light that only shows me whats ahead of me the next 30-40 yards, but on a bike going typically 10-15 mph it seems fine. Adding more light allows me to see further ahead but at the same time lowers the sensitivity of my eyes.

So what do you guys use all that light for? I ride with my lights on half power as it gives me plenty of light for what I need. Do you really ride so fast that you need the whole trail turned into daylight? ;)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:59 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:32 pm
Posts: 3086
Location: Dallas, TX
That's a good question. ^^^

Before I rebuilt my lights, all I knew was the light I had wasn't enough. I seriously could have zip-tied a couple of D-cell flashlights on my bike and it would have been about the same. :D

On paper, my helmet light puts out about 1180 lumen (configured for a spot light) and my bar light puts out about 800 lumen (wide angle light). I'm very happy with them and how well I can see on the blackest of nights. I'm especially giddy about the helmet light. When there's a bit of dust or pollen in the air I can see the actual spot beam shooting out over the fields. ;)

Right now I have no desire to increase the lumen of my lights. If better LEDs are produced, I might upgrade if it would give me a longer battery life or allow me to carry less batteries in the pack.

_________________
http://about.me/marpilli


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:05 pm 
Offline
grumpeh kitty!
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 8:47 pm
Posts: 340
Just remember that lights advertised at x,000 lumens will never come close to that "out the front" once all losses and inefficiencies take their cuts. Maybe 70-75% if you're lucky? Usually these lights are listing the manufacturer's rated luminous flux of the LED emitter at maximum current.

Also, higher output means you'll need suitable capacity from your power source. That may mean higher-capacity cells or an additional number of moderate capacity cells. Both present a cost penalty and the latter a weight penalty (but not really major in either case).

That said, ~700 lumens OTF from each of 2 lights has usually been more than enough for me. One on the bars and one on the helmet. These are 1-cell flashlights (18650 Li-ion). Usually my night rides are 2 hours max and I have plenty of capacity left at the end; but I rarely run either light on high for very long. I carry a spare light & battery in my backpack but have never needed to use it.

_________________
-- Frank --


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:47 pm 
Offline
stealth kitty
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:18 am
Posts: 1244
I don't know how much is enough. I got 650 lumens from my Cygolite Explorer 650 and it's already bright enough. It probably depends on how dark your area is.

Marp, on the other hand is competing with the Indian Diwali festival (Festival of Lights)
Image

_________________
SKITTLETITS!!! That is all.

Image
mmm bacon.

http://battlelog.battlefield.com/bf4/user/Shibiwan/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:57 pm 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
I use a pair of cheap Xinese XM-L copies, claimed output 1000 lumens, actual output IMHO not even half of that. For XC trails (i.e. no uber-technical rock hopping), mid-insensity level gives me plenty of light.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:58 pm 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
Shibiwan wrote:
Image


LOL is that your proposal moment Shibi? :lol:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 7:24 pm 
Offline
revolting kitty
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:17 am
Posts: 1319
Those numbers were for LED ratings, not necessarily output. From what I've read, an LED with lm rating burns cooler at lower levels and is more efficient. A 2000 lm light at low or medium will put out as much or more light than a 1000 lm light on high, right?

Trying to keep my head cool and my bar light bright for commuting. The rear light was for extremely high visibility in foggy situations.

This is all very new to me. I don't own good lights, just junky cheapo stuff. I plan to do some road riding up to the pool before sunrise and after dark which are the heaviest traffic times around here. If my specs are way off, let me know.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:22 pm 
Offline
stealth kitty
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:18 am
Posts: 1244
Sti wrote:
LOL is that your proposal moment Shibi? :lol:


No, that was actually the guy at the Circle K around the corner.... LOL

-S

_________________
SKITTLETITS!!! That is all.

Image
mmm bacon.

http://battlelog.battlefield.com/bf4/user/Shibiwan/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:48 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:21 pm
Posts: 2314
Location: NY
Sandrenseren wrote:
In an attempt not to derail vmac's thread with philosophical questions about light, I'll pop my general questions here..

Rear light is just about being seen so I use a cheapo $10 blinky thingy for that - it doesn't illuminate anything but the cars will see me and avoid me.


So what do you guys use all that light for? I ride with my lights on half power as it gives me plenty of light for what I need. Do you really ride so fast that you need the whole trail turned into daylight? ;)



FWIW your correct for the most part. Going over what is cut out. Currently I run a 1800 niterider pro on the front because of the wide angle and on the helmet I run a 600 lumen niterider. For the rear I have the Planet Bike Superflash Rear Light. I've thought about using a Lezyne Femto Drive Headlight which puts out more then the PB superflash. The only reason I would do this is for more light to see behind me in a quick glance on top of because my helmet light will only go to where I look. Further more my trails sometimes have muggers, bums, weirdos that walk them late at night with no light and sometimes with a quick glance back I've seen them crossing the trail after I have passed. It's kind of scary.

Back on the subject of lights turning the trail into day light. This would depend on the trail. For me the more open the more light I would need because it doesn't reflect back as much. If the trail was close width single track going through tree's and tight turns; having a ton of light isn't as good because it will reflect everything back at you; hindering the power out put. That's why lot's of riders who ride close width single track *say northeast style* usually run at a lower lumen. In more open country it will let the light use it's full potential. Like you said though, another thing to take into consideration is speed and your actual eyes at night. Normally you should run your lights on medium because your light source will last longer and save juice for when you need to run them on full power.

Typically you want to run a spot beam style on your head and a flood pattern on your bars. I've read sometimes others switch that vice versa.

So do you need 5000 lumens :lol:That answer is no. Endurance + output = time. More is less, less is more but, a max of 2000 running on medium say 1000 will last longer then a light that has a max of 700 and will provide more lumens per hour. Refer to reason 3 below for a high lumen light.

IMO riding single track at night with your current set up is fine. Just remember to always have a back up light just in case something goes wrong. That brings me back to that little Lezyne Femto Drive Headlight that you could mount on your rear and set it to flash, that way if every other light source you have fails for some weird reason simply just mount it to your bars on the constant mode to have light. My current set up total is around 2000-2200 guessing. Empty beer rated the 600 at 485 total but didn't do a test on the 1800. Reason I choose a 1800 and not lower is *not in order* 1) for security of the unknown *back to the bad people on my trails.* 2) I got a great deal on it 3) Running a high lumen light *the 1800 is 700* on medium but will last longer then running a normal max 700 on high and 4)There's never enough light once you ride with a ton of light, it can grow on you and your wallet.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:23 pm 
Offline
revolting kitty
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:17 am
Posts: 1319
Awesome, as always, Hutch!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 1:41 am 
Offline
stealth kitty
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:18 am
Posts: 1244
So... when are you going to install this on your bike?

Image

_________________
SKITTLETITS!!! That is all.

Image
mmm bacon.

http://battlelog.battlefield.com/bf4/user/Shibiwan/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:39 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:21 pm
Posts: 2314
Location: NY
Adding to what I said before walking out side in the cold reminded me of something I forgot to add. Cold weather. Usually cold weather below 32 will greatly effect output and run times. Doesn't matter if it's self contained or has a pack with cable. Even if you try to put a pack with cable somewhere away from the cold air it will get to it. On a given night ride you should see half the run time or less then usual. It's just because everything has to work harder to produce light.

On the flip side, hot weather won't effect your lights unless you stop a ton in which they could become very hot but that still won't drain them like the cold does. As long as air is flowing during the hot nights you will be fine.

Snow/rain.

Snow depending if it's a sleet you will be fine as it's not like rain. Rain can get into everything. Either behind the light lenses or if you have a ton of cooling vents this could be a serious problem. The 600 I run has been caught in one major down pour and didn't have any problems but that could be the design and rubber seal. The 1800 is covered with heat cut outs and vents. If it's going to possibly rain, I leave that one home and keep the pace slower.

Off the top of my head; BAJA design lights are supposed to be water proof. Not just resistant *like most lights, including mine* but actually water proof up to 30-35 feet.

/FIN


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:55 am 
Offline
fat kitty!
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:08 pm
Posts: 108
HUTCH wrote:
So do you need 5000 lumens :lol:That answer is no. Endurance + output = time. More is less, less is more but, a max of 2000 running on medium say 1000 will last longer then a light that has a max of 700 and will provide more lumens per hour. Refer to reason 3 below for a high lumen light.

Are you sure that's correct?

If you use an identical battery pack for the big 2000 lm light, running it at 1000 lm at half power and the small 700 lm at full power I'm not sure the big one lasts longer. In other words I'm not certain that making a 2000 lm light output 1000 lm is more economical than making a 700 lm light output 700 lm. Big lights typically comes with bigger battery packs and that what provides the long run time. Put a similar battery pack on the small light and that just might come out on top.

HUTCH wrote:
4)There's never enough light once you ride with a ton of light, it can grow on you and your wallet.

Then why am I more than satisfied with running my lights at half power? They produce a lot of light even at half power, so I am quite used to running with "a ton of light" yet I can't really say I feel the need for "two tons of light" or even more.. :D

Heck I would do fine running just one of the lights to be honest if it wasn't for the security of bringing a spare. Having a single light setup die in the middle of the ride puts a bit dent in the fun factor. A bit of moon light and 20-30 minutes to let your eyes adjust to the dark and you'll make it out anyway, but I prefer the dual setup and just riding out on one light if the second light dies.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 5:17 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:21 pm
Posts: 2314
Location: NY
Sandrenseren wrote:
HUTCH wrote:
So do you need 5000 lumens :lol:That answer is no. Endurance + output = time. More is less, less is more but, a max of 2000 running on medium say 1000 will last longer then a light that has a max of 700 and will provide more lumens per hour. Refer to reason 3 below for a high lumen light.

Are you sure that's correct?

If you use an identical battery pack for the big 2000 lm light, running it at 1000 lm at half power and the small 700 lm at full power I'm not sure the big one lasts longer. In other words I'm not certain that making a 2000 lm light output 1000 lm is more economical than making a 700 lm light output 700 lm. Big lights typically comes with bigger battery packs and that what provides the long run time. Put a similar battery pack on the small light and that just might come out on top.

HUTCH wrote:
4)There's never enough light once you ride with a ton of light, it can grow on you and your wallet.

Then why am I more than satisfied with running my lights at half power? They produce a lot of light even at half power, so I am quite used to running with "a ton of light" yet I can't really say I feel the need for "two tons of light" or even more.. :D

Heck I would do fine running just one of the lights to be honest if it wasn't for the security of bringing a spare. Having a single light setup die in the middle of the ride puts a bit dent in the fun factor. A bit of moon light and 20-30 minutes to let your eyes adjust to the dark and you'll make it out anyway, but I prefer the dual setup and just riding out on one light if the second light dies.



The above response to your question is for a non DIY light. Given you set up a DIY light correct with the power and power regulators you could easily pass the times I provided so you are correct with that. On the other hand this made me think if niterider provides a way to increase the the run time for a non DIY light. So I called them. They do. They sell a eight cell battery compared to my four. For the 1800 they don't make a direct conversion yet *soon he said* but they do have the parts to convert my light to run with the 8 cell battery which would bump my times up to 1800 at 4 hours 700 for 6 hours and 400 for 12 hours. I could also just carry a spare battery which is cheaper *135$* compared to the conversion which is about 299$; given the 8 cell battery is 200$ alone. As for battery packs that depends on the output - not the size. The four cell on mine is a race version compared to the eight, running the eight means more weight but a longer run time on a higher out put of light. For the 1000LM 700LM vs time debate. You would have to change the regulator diode on the light designed for 700LM to work with a battery designed for a 1000LM light or you would damage the system. Someone else feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

Sorry if the first response didn't answer you question or confused you but again, it's very easy to get long run times with a DIY set up with the correct hardware so it doesn't damage the system.

The second part, I don't know? You like your set up. If your fine with it then leave it. I would still carry at least some other source of light cause it's a cloudy night. :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 7:44 pm 
Offline
fat kitty!
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:08 pm
Posts: 108
HUTCH wrote:
The second part, I don't know? You like your set up. If your fine with it then leave it. I would still carry at least some other source of light cause it's a cloudy night. :)

I carry a focused beam light on my helmet with it's own battery and a flood light on the handlebar also with it's own battery, why would I need more sources of light? Two lights and two batteries does the trick for me. As for the amount of light I could make do with just one of the two lights, but that would leave me in a tight spot if that one light died. So I have two lights, I use both lights on half power and don't really get why I would need any more light than that - hence the curiosity in the subject, "why do you guys need those crazy amounts of light".. :D

As for all the battery pack prices and stuff you totally lost me there.

Question remains (unless you've already answered it and I just didn't understand it) what gives you the best battery life, a small 700 lm light running at full power or a big 2000 lm light running at roughly 1/3, assuming that they use identical battery packs. In other words, if I want a certain amount of light on the trail am I better of buying a big ass light source and running it at low power or a smaller light source running at full power?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 7:59 pm 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
Fugget about batteries, we need this! :lol:

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=htt ... Q&dur=4915


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:16 pm 
Offline
revolting kitty
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:17 am
Posts: 1319
^that's cool!

STI: This is where I used to get all my R/C plane batteries from. You could just match up the volts and mAh and order the battery and put the proper connector on for a fraction of what the light company wants to charge you.

Sandre: You are correct that the bigger lights have bigger packs and allows more run time. It was explained to me that there is quite a bit of efficiency loss in the form of heat when running a bulb at its highest rating. From what I understand, a higher rated bulb with a higher Voltage battery pack will spill less energy as heat and will last longer when running below its max.

Let me know if I was given bad info. Also, as stated before, this is more for safety on the road than riding single track.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:40 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:21 pm
Posts: 2314
Location: NY
Sandrenseren wrote:
HUTCH wrote:
The second part, I don't know? You like your set up. If your fine with it then leave it. I would still carry at least some other source of light cause it's a cloudy night. :)

I carry a focused beam light on my helmet with it's own battery and a flood light on the handlebar also with it's own battery, why would I need more sources of light? Two lights and two batteries does the trick for me. As for the amount of light I could make do with just one of the two lights, but that would leave me in a tight spot if that one light died. So I have two lights, I use both lights on half power and don't really get why I would need any more light than that - hence the curiosity in the subject, "why do you guys need those crazy amounts of light".. :D

As for all the battery pack prices and stuff you totally lost me there.

Question remains (unless you've already answered it and I just didn't understand it) what gives you the best battery life, a small 700 lm light running at full power or a big 2000 lm light running at roughly 1/3, assuming that they use identical battery packs. In other words, if I want a certain amount of light on the trail am I better of buying a big ass light source and running it at low power or a smaller light source running at full power?


The battery pack thing was a tangent. Sorry. Though kind of ties into the 2000LM & 700LM thing. The last part, good question. Don't really know the answer to that. IMO and to my understanding if they both draw the same amount of amps they both would be equal time/LM. That's if they are both equal in amps/battery drawing.

WMAC just pointed out his understanding and I agree with him because that's the same thing I've heard/read. The above response is if they both are identical batteries except lumen output, but I could be wrong.


That would be if you used a larger battery on the 700. Say the 700LM light runs for 3 hours on max with a regular battery then with a larger cell with the right set up that would extend the time at the same max setting. The only difference would be the 700LM would max out on 700LM compared to 2000LM would be able to run 2000LM max for a shorter time period. So in your case getting the 700LM with the *identical battery* larger battery pack would be better because 700LM is all you need/want. So if you don't need it *more light* then there's no point in getting it if you like your current total output.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:49 pm 
Offline
revolting kitty
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:17 am
Posts: 1319
You'd need more volts to run a 2000lm light vs a 700lm light. Does this help?

Image

It seems to me that a goal of a good lighting system is to minimize heat. Using a several cell series to create high voltage in tandem with a buck driver seems like the best scenario, right?

It makes sense that you can't always get this scenario with a multiple light set up, so, a boost driver is required.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2015 10:45 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1023
80% + of my training rides are done in the dark, so I have an interest in the light topic, and a bit of experience too, all of which adds up to a few opinions.

When I first started night riding over 15 years ago, my friend the LBS owner rigged up an old Cateye light, changing the reflector and bulb, and we found decent lead-acid batteries at an industrial surplus outlet that we put in standard size water bottles. About a 2 lb. battery powered a 6 watt halogen bulb for 3 hours if we had all good battery cells, but we always caried an extra battery in our camelbacks, just in case.
I dunno how many lumens that light put out, but I'd be surprised if it was much more than 400. We've come a long way since then, with the advent of sturdy super bright LED's and rechargeable Li Ion batteries.

However, everything being relative, we had trail lights that were comparable to $200 mtb light systems, and they cost us 30-40 bucks to make. We were stylin'. It's kinda funny to remember back to how we marveled at the way the trails were 'lit up'.

These days, both my partner and I have Cygolite 'Centauri 1700' on our handlebars, with the 'big' battery (I can put it under my 90mm stem) and for most trail riding, I use mine at the second-lowest setting, which is rated around 800 lumens. But it's a very BRIGHT 800 lumens. It's lowest setting is around as bright as our old lead-acid powered lights were.
Since my training route starts at my door, around 80% of it is on pavement, so a tail light is necessary. We both got Origin8 LED's complete with a seatpost elastic tool-less mount. Very quick 'n easy to use. They are re-chageable via USB. On high 'flash' mode, they put out a searing 60 lumens, more light than many household flashlights back in the day.

We're both firm believers in having more than enough light, so we also have a variety of lesser flashers that we deploy on our bags, etc. I got a Planet Bike Superflash for that, and just by itself it is a more-than-adequete tail light. The Origin8 light is also marketed under at least one other label. The price for that light is 35 bucks retail, which IMO is a very good deal.
Nobody can run me down from behind and drag my body 1/2 block underneath their Escalade now and get away with "I just couldn't see him , occifer"....there is no doubt that we got the light to be SEEN from behind. In fact, we trade off. Whoever is riding sweep uses their two lights, the guy in front does not blind his buddy 1 bike length back with that 60 lumen blast. Over an hour's time, that can get to ya.


Another thing we both got is a another Cygo...we mount up a Mity Cross on our helmets. It's more of a 'spot ' beam, which I prefer for a helmet light, and on high it easily puts out 800 lumens. I assume this discussion has already addressed the 'one on the bar, one on the helmet' issue.......but we find that having the two lights is practically essential. Since we ride around 5 night a week, we can notice how it makes a difference for us.

So, my buddy has a potential 2500 lumens on his bar, and 800 on his helmet. This is more than enough to see everything we want/need to, and more than enough to BE seen by.
I got a skimpy-by comparison 2500 Lumens total up front. But I believe that it's enough.

Interesting finding. Cops, and other 'normal' (i.e. sober) peeps compliment us on the brightness and upon our visibility. For the most part, drunks, mentally ill indigent types and other folks under the influence of something complain. Around these parts, crystal meth is a biggie, and of course the tweakers seem to be out there in the dark, scurrying about, often up to no good. These guys really object to our lights, but if we're moving at 16 mph or faster, we barely hear their screeching before we are out of earshot. Hopefully gunshot range, too.

I really think that anybody who is going to be riding after dark fairly often, should seriously consider the bar/helmet combo.......in addition to providing more light where you need it, the helmet light really helps you with sideways visibility on the pavement. If somebody is contemplating rolling a Stop in front of us or getting ready to kick their door open right in front of you, putting that 800 lumens in his/her rearview mirror really lights up the interior of their car, and causes them to HAVE to see you, so to speak.

Part of our ride route takes us right through central downtown San Diego, so we 'interact' with traffic every time, and these lighting strategies are no doubt a big part of our success in surviving so far.

Oh, and so far, the only part of our urban/trail ride where I use both my lights at full "high' power consistently, is when we bomb it through downtown. We don't do super risky critical-mass-stupid stuff-we stop at red lights and such, but we find that that max-power really ups the safety factor, and surprisingly, even the courtesy factor from drivers. Even the cab drivers!

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2015 11:27 pm 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
I changed my night light habits after I got Trail Led XXX. Before, I used to ride with a pair of lights, helmet and bars. Now I ride just with the XXX on helmet. The light is bright (1800 true lumen), with great color, throw and spill, and lasts three hours on max output. There is no way you cannot see me coming when this thing is on! :lol:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 1:31 am 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1023
Sti wrote:
I changed my night light habits after I got Trail Led XXX. Before, I used to ride with a pair of lights, helmet and bars. Now I ride just with the XXX on helmet. The light is bright (1800 true lumen), with great color, throw and spill, and lasts three hours on max output. There is no way you cannot see me coming when this thing is on! :lol:



Unless, of course, the driver is legally blind. I suspect as much after observing the driving habits of some of our local cabbies. :?

Actually, having a good strong light on the bar, or just a moderately strong bar light, really helps show the topographical relief of the trail surface. Sometimes I miss the rocks with my helmet light on account of it not throwing much in the way of shadows.

S for trail riding, the bar light plays an important role. The helmet light I love, but so I can look down, see if there's a stick in my chainring, etc. Plus it's awesome for reflecting of critters' eyes in the dark. Red= bunnies. Green= 'yotes.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 3:59 am 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
I run into deer all the time, they reflect white. :) I thought I would need a bar light but I don't. The XXX gives me enough light even for the most technical singletrack.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 6:30 am 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1023
Sti wrote:
I run into deer all the time, they reflect white. :) I thought I would need a bar light but I don't. The XXX gives me enough light even for the most technical singletrack.


The deer in our local preserve here are so tame at night, its' like being in a petting zoo. My friend had his way blocked once by a big antlered buck, while a doe and some fawns crossed the trail behind him. He thought that was pretty cool.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 5:00 pm 
Offline
friendly kitty
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 3:30 am
Posts: 117
Location: Mountain Top, PA
I ride only with a 1st generation Magicshine 900 lumen (rated, anyways) helmet mount and a 2nd generation Magicshine battery. Night rides are always on familiar trails, it's always felt sufficient.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 6:43 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1023
jonz wrote:
I ride only with a 1st generation Magicshine 900 lumen (rated, anyways) helmet mount and a 2nd generation Magicshine battery. Night rides are always on familiar trails, it's always felt sufficient.



The trails I ride 5 nights a week, on average, I could literally ride with no lights, albeit a little slower than usual.

Another topic worth discussing, in this era of mega bright lighting, is "light use etiquette" for the trail, the roads, and the bike/pedestrian paths.

What do you all think about these subjects? I got definite opinions, as usual, but I will withhold them for the time being, unless nobody else speaks up.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 6:49 pm 
Offline
yappin' kitty
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 12:27 am
Posts: 682
Location: Dallas, TX
Sti wrote:
I thought I would need a bar light but I don't. The XXX gives me enough light even for the most technical singletrack.

Same here. I'm running a XXX, as well. I have no problems going XC race pace at night with it on my helmet, even on the most technical trails.

_________________
N00B DIY'er


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 9:01 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:32 pm
Posts: 3086
Location: Dallas, TX
Ray Dolor wrote:
Another topic worth discussing, in this era of mega bright lighting, is "light use etiquette" for the trail, the roads, and the bike/pedestrian paths.

Definitely worth discussing and we can branch into a new thread if you like. I only use a handlebar mounted light when I commute and over half of the trip is on paved multi-use paths. I always watch for bikers, joggers, and dog walkers ahead of me. When I see them I tilt the handlebar light downward so it doesn't blind them.

When ridding at night in the woods using a helmet light I either turn it down or make sure my head is pointed away from another rider when I've stopped to chat.

Common courtesy...

_________________
http://about.me/marpilli


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 11:53 pm 
Offline
pussy
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 5:23 am
Posts: 4016
I don't meet many people / cars on my night rides, but when I do, I cover the light with my hand or try to point it away.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 6:59 am 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1023
Yes, Marpilli and Sti, those are things I do, too.

Maybe there should be a thread just for this discussion. I'll start one, and hopefully you won't mind if I quote both of your comments in it.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Theme created StylerBB.net