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 Post subject: DIY Bike Cargo Trailer
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:06 am 
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big hucker
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** CLICK ON ANY IMAGE FOR A LARGER VERSION **

I've had a desire to build a bike cargo trailer. Oddly enough, I have no real reason for needing one. :)

While browsing CraigsList, I noticed the following gem for sale.

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I met the seller at dusk and I didn't get a close look at the frame (lesson learned). When I brought it home, I immediately found the stress fractures by the arm of the trailer. I figured I could fix it somehow and I wasn't worried about the $20 I spent so far.

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I removed all of the bolts...

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And had it stripped down to just the frame...

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I salvaged as much as I thought could be useful on future projects.

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Tools that were used...

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Scraps for the trash...

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I wanted to cut down the frame to make it more narrow. In order to keep it tracking straight, I had to perform a simple calculation. For every inch I could move the arm outward, I would be able to remove two inches of frame from the center. Since I could move the arm out 3.5", I could remove a total of 7" of frame.

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Removed the wheels and then removed the remaining bolts to cut it down and try and repair the breaks.

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The damage was worse than I thought.

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I needed to find something to insert into the frame at the breaks to patch it back together. The outer part of the frame was held together by the bolts that secured the wheel dropouts. Within that part of the frame tubing was an insert. I wandered around the garage with this insert looking for anything that had the same diameter.

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Found a wooden extension that would work. I wanted something a little more sturdy...

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Looked up on my wall and spotted an old (painted) handlebar. Viola!

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Rounded out one of the damaged spots as best I could.

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Cut off a section of handlebar and secured it into place.

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The other damaged part was really close to a bend and I couldn't get the handlebar piece far enough in to secure it. I had to go hunting for something in the garage I could wrap around the bar to reinforce it. I had an extending closet rod that was the same diameter as the frame.

Cut off part of the sleeve and made and then made a cut length-wise to fit it over the frame.

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Seems like it will work.

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Secured it into place with the plate that holds on the arm.

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Now it's time to cut 7" out of the center of the frame. I cut some additional handlebar pieces to join them back together.

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Nice and neat (certainly better than my shade-tree repairs). :lol:

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Narrower frame reassembled.

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Close up of the repairs.

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I purchased some 2" webbing and plastic slides to make the cargo platform.

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Measured the internal dimensions and added 24" to ensure I had enough webbing to "relax" the net (making a lower center of gravity) if I needed to.

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Measure and cut.

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To keep the ends from unraveling, I passed them near the flame from a propane torch. There's probably a dozen different ways to seal the ends of cut nylon webbing. This was the easiest considering what I had on-hand.

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Using some cardboard, I made a trace of the inside of the frame. I'll use this to make various net patters from the webbing.

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Played with several patterns until I found one I liked the best (on the right).

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Used some bricks to hold the webbing steady.

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E6000 adhesive is just plain great. It bonds almost anything I need and remains flexible. I used it to glue the webbing together to form the net.

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Added bricks on top for some pressure.

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While I'm at it, I cut a piece of inner tube and glued it to the clamp of the trailer.

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Next day: I used a razor to trim the excess rubber from the clamp.

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The net is ready!

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I added one slider to each piece of webbing extending from the net.

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Sequence of photos showing the weaving pattern to secure the net to the frame.

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Done.

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I really like this idea because I can loosen the net so it will sag for a lower center of gravity.

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With netting and wheels, it weighs in at 15#. 1.5# heavier than a Bob Yak trailer.

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Attach the trailer to the Disc Trucker. :)

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Load up 24# of bricks for the test ride.

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Aaaand away we go! :D





Instructables link: http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Bic ... ike-trail/

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:21 am 
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bad kitty!
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That turned out real cool.
Very inspiring.

Next time you want to repair thin walled aluminum, I suggest you use adhesive.
Not only is it faster, but it's also several times stronger than bolting it together.

Magura :)

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 Post subject: DIY Bike Cargo Trailer
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 3:30 pm 
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big hucker
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Location: Dallas, TX
Thank you. I considered adhesive. I was impatient and went for the bolts, though.

Could I still do so (when the time allows)? What would you recommend? Something available to the average consumer, I hope. ;)

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 12:01 am 
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pussy
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Very nice work!


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:22 pm 
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Marp, that's pretty cool.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 9:02 pm 
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bad kitty!
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Bonding it as well, will sure make it stronger.
Hysol 9466 or 3M DP405 is a good starting point.
A guy like you should always have one or the other in stock.


Magura :)

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 5:41 am 
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Well, you certainly went the extra mile for that DIY project....I hope it gets to return the favor with lots of miles hauling your whatever...

I once purchased a BOB Ibex trailer with the grand ideal of some big single track tour brewing in my head, but really all I've done with it is use it for a grocery getter.

Works great like that, too...the shock means I never break any eggs.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 6:17 am 
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big hucker
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Thank you. I'm in the process of putting together a bike suitable for bike camping. My hope is to get one or more of my kids interested in shorter trips and use this trailer to pull all the necessary stuff. I plan on getting a frame bag for the solo adventures.

In reality, it'll probably only see use 2-3 times a year. ;)

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 5:45 pm 
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timid kitty
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Very impressive Marp. I love fabrication and seeing this come together is cool.

Where do you intend to use this? What trails?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 5:46 pm 
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Clown kitty

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marpilli wrote:
Thank you. I'm in the process of putting together a bike suitable for bike camping. My hope is to get one or more of my kids interested in shorter trips and use this trailer to pull all the necessary stuff. I plan on getting a frame bag for the solo adventures.

In reality, it'll probably only see use 2-3 times a year. ;)



Well, in the meantime, don't break any eggs.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2015 1:28 am 
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friendly kitty

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I mentioned this build to someone looking for a way to get equipment out to a work site without a bike. Just have to get one that has the jogger handle and front wheel attachment.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:24 am 
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big hucker
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cleared2land wrote:
Very impressive Marp. I love fabrication and seeing this come together is cool.

Where do you intend to use this? What trails?

Thank you. I won't be using it on any singletrack, that's for sure. We have a nice greenbelt trail that leads to a state park with camping spots. That'll probably be the first trip with one of the kiddos.

Ray Dolor wrote:
Well, in the meantime, don't break any eggs.

:D

Kronk wrote:
I mentioned this build to someone looking for a way to get equipment out to a work site without a bike. Just have to get one that has the jogger handle and front wheel attachment.

Yeah, it would be good for that. You wouldn't even need to do much modification to it (if the equipment isn't too heavy).

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2015 3:13 am 
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timid kitty
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marpilli wrote:
cleared2land wrote:
Very impressive Marp. I love fabrication and seeing this come together is cool.

Where do you intend to use this? What trails?

Thank you. I won't be using it on any singletrack, that's for sure.


I saw a guy a while back with a kiddie trailer (and a kiddo) behind his Niner riding River Legacy. Now, I realize RL isn't lot's of topography, but it does have some and they were having fun. I watched them go though one of the bigger dips and it was a thrill for the kiddo.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2015 3:37 am 
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lil' hucker
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@ 2:45.....there goes the eggs!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 1:14 pm 
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timid kitty
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Nice work!

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 1:15 am 
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net wurker wrote:
@ 2:45.....there goes the eggs!


Watching the trailer video again makes me question my judgement.
I used to pull some rather expensive clinical equipment on the BOB when I was working a few days a week at a hospital less than 5 miles from where I live. To get home I would coast down the Bachman Drive hill, and again I was pulling my own expensive equipment in the BOB behind me.

I got up to 37 mph on that hill. I felt confident about my ability to control the bike and the trailer, but I really did not consider the possibilities aside from that enough.
Nothing catastrophic ever came of it, and I always enjoy bicycle commuting, whenever it's possible, but in retrospect I really shouldn't have done that.

And, like I said, I've broken more eggs driving the groceries home than I ever did pedaling them.

The single-following wheel design really can be a very stable one for bicycles, but it isn't foolproof.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 2:51 am 
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big hucker
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I like the single wheel designs. If I were to ever buy something, it would probably be an Extrawheel Voyager.

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