HK

the place for sore tacos
It is currently Fri Oct 18, 2019 1:37 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 219 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:01 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
Good to see so long as you’re not in a motor vehicle


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 6:36 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
MiniTrail wrote:
Good to see so long as you’re not in a motor vehicle


Lost me.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:19 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
We see plenty of deer strikes in my area and that’s a wee bit larger animal for a car or motorcycle to make contact with. I recall seeing moose warning signs while up in north country and Maine. Scared me that’s for sure
I did not mean to distract from your more pleasant sighting. Would love to see one myself


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:45 pm 
Offline
big hucker

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:10 pm
Posts: 3467
Location: Cazadero Ca.
Cool DJ. Many years ago I took the family on a camping trip to Yellowstone. Pulled into our campsite and started to unpack, when a young bullwinkle casually walked through our campsite. Amazing animals.

_________________
"Take a giant step, outside your mind" Taj Mahal.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 6:21 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
^ Cool

This happened about four days ago. A late post, sorry.
Finally caught up to my Mink. I say that because I’ve spotted him 3 times prior for a fleeting glimpse. He always dove in the river and disappeared under the water. Always in the same 100 yard stretch along this river.

I got about 15 photos of this guy. At one point I was 2' from him as he ate a fish under the rock I was standing on. Chocolate brown coloring, looks just like a mink jacket. Lol

He was in the river out of the river running along the boulders, disappearing in the water and showing up 40’ away. It was insane trying to figure out where he’d pop up next. When I first saw him he was on the other side of the river. He quickly was in the river but instead of diving under he swam on top this time. The rapids quickly carried him down river and across to my side and he climbed out right at my feet. What an amazing experience. I’ve never seen one until last week. I saw him in the morning and he disappeared. I went back to the same spot later in the day and that’s when the above sightings happened. I spent an hour watching him, such a cool little dude.

I followed him through the boulder field shoreline. He disappeared in the boulders in and out of sight. Diving into the river in and out but staying on my side of the river as I stalked him along. His in sight appearances only lasted 30 seconds at a time before he disappeared again. At one point I was standing on a boulder looking for him when I suddenly realized he was under the boulder I was standing on. He was eating a fish under there, I was in sandals, toes exposed and a bit nervous as I could hear him chomping through the bones just a two feet from me. I quickly snapped a couple of photos and then hopped to a boulder further away. He knew I was there and kept lifting his head to check on me as he ate.

Such a rare sight in Colorado. I’m sure many sightings are mistaken for River Otters.


Attachments:
83B837CB-F661-41B8-93F5-E2215649FC66.jpeg
83B837CB-F661-41B8-93F5-E2215649FC66.jpeg [ 311.13 KiB | Viewed 251 times ]
7F52EADB-6CD4-41AB-8F7C-45FA4A0B8711.jpeg
7F52EADB-6CD4-41AB-8F7C-45FA4A0B8711.jpeg [ 80.52 KiB | Viewed 251 times ]
65741067-1EAD-4B2D-B52B-2A7E31E1D5B8.jpeg
65741067-1EAD-4B2D-B52B-2A7E31E1D5B8.jpeg [ 51.08 KiB | Viewed 251 times ]
6249C871-A2A8-47A3-AD4E-ED9C9B5B2280.jpeg
6249C871-A2A8-47A3-AD4E-ED9C9B5B2280.jpeg [ 85.8 KiB | Viewed 251 times ]
4FA8D3BD-5AB0-4B4D-A1DC-05C0724334FB.jpeg
4FA8D3BD-5AB0-4B4D-A1DC-05C0724334FB.jpeg [ 233.84 KiB | Viewed 252 times ]
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 10:30 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
Yeah those are cool to watch for sure. Saw one on the rock lined pier in Webster a few years back. Quite the set of teeth on them.

Was coming to add to this post today so thanks for the bump and the pics!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 1:11 am 
Offline
big hucker

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:10 pm
Posts: 3467
Location: Cazadero Ca.
There's no mistaking a mink from an otter. River otters are pretty common around here.

_________________
"Take a giant step, outside your mind" Taj Mahal.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 1:19 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
Cecropia Moth caterpillar the missus found today near Saranac. Nowhere near as fun to watch as the mink but crazy colorful

Attachment:
8309ABFC-2CA6-469D-B455-AFE4DDFAC90B.jpeg
8309ABFC-2CA6-469D-B455-AFE4DDFAC90B.jpeg [ 384.27 KiB | Viewed 238 times ]


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:36 am 
Offline
big hucker

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:10 pm
Posts: 3467
Location: Cazadero Ca.
Nice photo. 8-)

_________________
"Take a giant step, outside your mind" Taj Mahal.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 6:29 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
norton55 wrote:
There's no mistaking a mink from an otter. River otters are pretty common around here.


Oh, I agree but there are many people clueless about different species. I often hear people [mainly tourists] but also locals in Colorado refer to seeing an Elk as a Moose or even a deer as an Elk or vice versa.

Awesome caterpillar shot, Mini. It will turn into a cecropia moth. The largest caterpillar in North America.

Here’s what it will look like.


Attachments:
94A8FD7D-A608-4E04-864C-4C96D9C0B2FA.jpeg
94A8FD7D-A608-4E04-864C-4C96D9C0B2FA.jpeg [ 447.23 KiB | Viewed 233 times ]
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 6:35 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
MiniTrail wrote:
Yeah those are cool to watch for sure. Saw one on the rock lined pier in Webster a few years back. Quite the set of teeth on them.

Was coming to add to this post today so thanks for the bump and the pics!


Nice, I know the area you’re talking about.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 11:05 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
Figured you’d recall the pier

Big moth caterpillar sighting continues. Imperial moth today with a bic to show scale

Attachment:
81203784-46B1-4E76-A32D-0FF535A8BA14.jpeg
81203784-46B1-4E76-A32D-0FF535A8BA14.jpeg [ 529.24 KiB | Viewed 225 times ]


Attachment:
9F153698-76B3-415D-AF8B-D9150CB31708.jpeg
9F153698-76B3-415D-AF8B-D9150CB31708.jpeg [ 559.29 KiB | Viewed 225 times ]


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 6:21 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
One thing Upstate NY has is a lot of moths, butterflies/ caterpillars. Never lived anywhere that had more than what I recall seeing there. Cool shots.

Or maybe it was because I was a young boy running through the countryside hunting snakes and whatever else I could find. Down low to the ground you see everything. :laughing-rolling:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 1:31 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
I think you’d be surprised to see what it is now. Insect apocalypse is real. Hardly ever see a firefly anymore. Spiders and webs are scarce. Used to be you’d turn on the porch light and watch it get mobbed by moths and such. No more.
Drove from Rochester to Watertown last Friday evening. Not one bug on the windshield. That shit ain’t right. Especially seeing the thruway passes through Motezuma


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:46 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
MiniTrail wrote:
I think you’d be surprised to see what it is now. Insect apocalypse is real. Hardly ever see a firefly anymore. Spiders and webs are scarce. Used to be you’d turn on the porch light and watch it get mobbed by moths and such. No more.
Drove from Rochester to Watertown last Friday evening. Not one bug on the windshield. That shit ain’t right. Especially seeing the thruway passes through Motezuma



Crazy, fireflies everywhere every night back in the 70’s to 80’s. So what’s going on here? Never heard of a big decline in insects.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 11:48 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
DIRTJUNKIE wrote:
So what’s going on here?

Pretty much everything we do works against them.

The bug count on the windshield is a real gem. You read about studies referring to the lack of windshield/license plate/bumper bug splat as proof of the decline but no single reason given as to why. I find it funny because they’re looking at one very good reason. Cars are killing machines and they’ve been splatting bugs for decades. Running out of bugs to smear.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 1:58 pm 
Offline
big hucker

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:10 pm
Posts: 3467
Location: Cazadero Ca.
That's interesting.............and concerning.

_________________
"Take a giant step, outside your mind" Taj Mahal.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 3:38 am 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
Crazy ^

Speaking of bugs. Today I filmed a pretty rare thing, I think. I’ve never seen the two together anyway. Seems to reason they compete for the same food so maybe it’s not so rare. Anyway, I filmed a Broadtail Hummingbird competing with a Hummingbird Moth. I’m sure it the hummers temper flared just enough he could easily take out the moth.



Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 12:50 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
DJ that’s awesome! Two faves in on video. Amazing. The bird looks curious more than anything. Could have pecked the moth right out of the air. Looks to be a good size moth too. Don’t see them that big often around here. Just videod one here a few days ago in fact. Always cool to see


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 4:01 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1287
Yeah, those hummers can be quite aggressive at times. Wife has a fountain and lots of flowers out on our deck, which brings them in, and every once in a while one will challenge our cats. That doesn't go well for the hummer. The cats also love to chase the moths, too.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 6:43 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
You guys do know this is not just a regular moth, right? Officially called a (sphinx moth) but more commonly called a Hummingbird Moth due to their remarkable resemblance while flying and feeding. I’ve seen them numerous times before but never in the same vicinity as a hummingbird. Interesting how the hummer fights him off just like another hummer. A bit more cautious and intrigued though. Must look like a strange looking hummer to him. LOL


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 6:57 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1287
DIRTJUNKIE wrote:
You guys do know this is not just a regular moth, right? Officially called a (sphinx moth) but more commonly called a Hummingbird Moth due to their remarkable resemblance while flying and feeding. I’ve seen them numerous times before but never in the same vicinity as a hummingbird. Interesting how the hummer fights him off just like another hummer. A bit more cautious and intrigued though. Must look like a strange looking hummer to him. LOL


We used to see them all the time, but that same cat, when he was living feral in the canyon, developed a taste for them whenever one came around our 2nd story deck. he'd gulp em down right in front of me, in a flash.
There's hardly ever even one that comes by in the summers now, so I think the thing about shrinking biodiversity is gonna lead to serious changes, planet-wide.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 11:14 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
DJ the last time you posted a hummingbird moth I told you about this picture but never shared it. Wife and I spotted one at rest on a wander at Iroquois wildlife refuge September of 2016. Like you we switch to video when we spot them because they move to fast. This one was very docile for several minutes.

Had not seen one at rest before or since. Plenty of closeup video but this is the only at rest photo. Clear portions in the wing!

Attachment:
09E3A2F2-D400-440B-AED1-C13016955D12.jpeg
09E3A2F2-D400-440B-AED1-C13016955D12.jpeg [ 1.26 MiB | Viewed 163 times ]


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 11:48 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
Sorry guys, wasn’t sure if you knew about these hummer moths. Confirmed now.

Very cool Mini. I don’t think I’ve seen one at rest. Great photo as well.

Ray, your cat story is pretty funny. I see them in Colorado in the day time in the high country. When I lived in San Diego I only saw them at night. I had a conversation with Hawg and he also said he only sees them at night in SoCal. You’re in San Diego, when do you see them?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 11:53 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
Ray Dolor wrote:
We used to see them all the time, but that same cat, when he was living feral in the canyon, developed a taste for them whenever one came around our 2nd story deck. he'd gulp em down right in front of me, in a flash.
There's hardly ever even one that comes by in the summers now, so I think the thing about shrinking biodiversity is gonna lead to serious changes, planet-wide.


2016 was the last decent year in my area. 3 scorching hot summers 16-18 knocked the numbers down considerably and they don’t seem to be bouncing back. I had hopes with this year being cooler that critters would return. Birds, bugs, reptiles counts are way down. Things we used to get tired of seeing like heron or even red wing black birds hardly seen. Ambush or assassin bugs also rare. Bullfrogs and turtles are down too.
I’m afraid all we’ll have left is pictures


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2019 9:46 am 
Offline
lil' hucker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:51 am
Posts: 1509
wife found this last weekend
most evil act in nature

Attachment:
A2804C4D-9EC0-4C98-8355-1EB11CC2C674.jpeg
A2804C4D-9EC0-4C98-8355-1EB11CC2C674.jpeg [ 308.74 KiB | Viewed 128 times ]


And in case you didn’t know what you’re looking at



hate wasps


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2019 5:03 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1287
DIRTJUNKIE wrote:
Sorry guys, wasn’t sure if you knew about these hummer moths. Confirmed now.

Very cool Mini. I don’t think I’ve seen one at rest. Great photo as well.

Ray, your cat story is pretty funny. I see them in Colorado in the day time in the high country. When I lived in San Diego I only saw them at night. I had a conversation with Hawg and he also said he only sees them at night in SoCal. You’re in San Diego, when do you see them?


DJ, I used to see them only at night as well, and not much in the winter.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2019 5:11 pm 
Offline
lil' hucker

Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:20 pm
Posts: 1287
MiniTrail wrote:
wife found this last weekend
most evil act in nature

Attachment:
A2804C4D-9EC0-4C98-8355-1EB11CC2C674.jpeg


And in case you didn’t know what you’re looking at



hate wasps


Yes, we have tiny wasps here in San Diego that target Monarch butterfly caterpillars. My wife was involved in the Monarch butterfly project, and dedicated a big chunk of her garden space to growing milkweed, aesclepia, (sp?) the only plant that Monarchs in our area will lay their eggs on. There used to be Monarchs all over the place, until the wasps showed up. A bit of a heart-breaker.

_________________
'Merica's Finest City


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2019 5:57 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
Yep, the insect world is cruel, it’s where horror flicks come from.

The Tarantula Wasp preys specifically on Tarantulas. The females are larger and stronger, they move along the desert landscape [I've watched them numerous times, and have been stung by one, stepped on it while barefoot. BTW ranked #2 most painful stings to humans in the insect world, trust me it’s true] and are so strong they flip over dirt clumps and rocks in search of a Tarantula den. Once they find one with a Tarantula inside she attacks. Always winning, her goal is to flip the Tarantula over and sting it on the soft abdomen region. The female wasps venom is so strong the Tarantula immediately becomes paralyzed. Still living but unable to move. The wasp then drags the Tarantula back into the a Tarantulas den. The wasp then lays a single egg on top of the soft abdomen of the Tarantula. Her job done, she covers the den back up with dirt and leaves. A week or whatever time frame goes by and the egg hatches a single baby wasp. The baby wasp then eats the Tarantula alive. The spider acts as nourishment until the baby wasp is strong enough to venture out on his or her own.

A horror flick waiting to be created. :o


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2019 6:05 pm 
Offline
big hucker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 2699
Location: Front Range Colorado
A video of the action, not mine.



Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 219 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Theme created StylerBB.net